“Now my friends are asking, ‘What should I do, what should I get?'” Said La Haise, who runs a gun and security training store near Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. “The preparation doesn’t look so bad now.”

In this photo taken on Friday, March 13, 2020, Paul Buescher poses with his amateur radio in Northfield Center Township, Ohio. Buescher is one of 32 members of a group in northeast Ohio who share a farm filled with enough canned and dry food and water to survive for years. For those in the often-mocked “prepper” community, this is quickly becoming their “I told you” moment as panic buying cleared store shelves in the US amid growing fears that the new coronavirus will self-quarantine many Americans has been forcing in their homes for weeks.

AP Photo / Tony Dejak

In this photo taken on Friday, March 13, 2020, Paul Buescher poses on his front porch in the Northfield Center Ward, Ohio. Buescher is one of 32 members of a group in northeast Ohio who share a farm with enough canned food and dry food and water for years. For those in the often-mocked “prepper” community, this is quickly becoming their “I told you” moment as panic buying cleared store shelves in the US amid growing fears that the new coronavirus will self-quarantine many Americans will force in their homes for weeks.

AP Photo / Tony Dejak

In this undated photo by Paul Buescher, canned food rests on shelves in a barn near Garretsville, Ohio. The food can be used by 32 members of a group in northeast Ohio who share a farm with enough canned food and dehydrated food and water to last for years. For those in the often-mocked “prepper” community, this is quickly becoming their “I told you” moment as panic buying cleared store shelves in the US amid growing fears that the new coronavirus will self-quarantine many Americans will force in their homes for weeks.

Paul Büscher on AP

In this undated photo by Paul Buescher, a 12-volt solar battery bank is stored in a barn near Garrettsville, Ohio. The battery bank can be used by 32 members of a group in northeast Ohio who share a farm with enough canned food and dry food and water for years. For those in the often-mocked “prepper” community, this is quickly becoming their “I told you” moment as panic buying cleared store shelves in the US as fears grow that the new coronavirus will self-quarantine many Americans will force in their homes for weeks.

Paul Büscher on AP

In this undated photo by Paul Buescher, water is stored in stacks of 2-liter bottles in a barn near Garrettsville, Ohio. The water can be used by 32 members of a group in northeast Ohio who share a farm with enough canned and dry food and water for years. For those in the often-mocked “prepper” community, this is quickly becoming their “I told you” moment as panic buying cleared store shelves in the US amid growing fears that the new coronavirus will self-quarantine many Americans will force in their homes for weeks.

Paul Büscher on AP

In this photo taken on Friday, March 13, 2020, Paul Buescher turns on his amateur radio in Northfield Center Township, Ohio. Buescher is one of 32 members of a group in northeast Ohio who share a farm filled with enough canned and dry food and water to survive for years. For those in the often-mocked “prepper” community, this is quickly becoming their “I told you” moment as panic buying cleared store shelves in the US amid growing fears that the new coronavirus will self-quarantine many Americans will force in their homes for weeks.

AP Photo / Tony Dejak

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) – Curt La Haise has suffered many beatings over the years from friends who called him paranoid for storing an eight month supply of groceries in his basement and having enough fuel to run his generator for nearly one Operate all winter year.

They no longer laugh amid panic buying that has cleared shelves in the US and growing fears that the new coronavirus will force many Americans to self-quarantine in their homes for weeks.

“Now my friends are saying,” What should I do, what should I get? “Said La Haise, who runs a gun and security training store near Sun Prairie, Wisconsin.” Preparing doesn’t look too bad now. “

For those in the often mocked “prepper” community, this quickly becomes their “I told you” moment. But many refuse to say that, even if it is in the back of their minds. They hope that they will finally be taken seriously and that more people will follow their example.

“We don’t laugh. We don’t say, ‘I told you,’ when people are arguing out there over toilet paper and hand sanitizer, ”said Paul Buescher of Northfield Center Township, Ohio.

Buescher is one of 32 members of a group in northeast Ohio who shares a farm filled with enough canned food and dehydrated food and water to last for years. He said he got calls asking for advice all day now.

Survival supply stores cannot keep up with demand for food kits and medical supplies.

“Every single business that has to do with emergency preparedness is overloaded,” said John Ramey, founder of a Colorado-based prepper website called The Prepared.

Most preppers say they care about self-reliance and common sense, and they quickly distance themselves from the “doomsday preppers” featured on television programs waiting for the day when most of the world’s population will be wiped off the map .

“The vast majority of these are ‘beans and plasters’, not ‘bullets and bunkers,'” said Ramey.

Jim Cobb, a disaster preparedness advisor and editor-in-chief of Prepper Survival Guide magazine, said he saw a couple of Prepper colleagues delighting on social media to see people crowding stores in search of disinfectant.

“I hate the thought of alienating one of them because they think it’s a bunch of elitist fools.” he said. “We try to take the opportunity that, for once, they don’t laugh and point the finger at us.”

While most people who test positive for the virus have mild or moderate symptoms, older adults and people with existing health problems are at greater risk and have a longer recovery time.

Experts say the most important thing is to practice safe hygiene: washing your hands frequently, covering your sneeze and cough, and staying home if you experience a fever or other symptoms.

The preppers have their own recommendations for anyone unsure of what to do next:

– Be prepared to stay home for at least two weeks. Have plenty to eat and drink. Don’t forget your pets and medicines. These include over-the-counter products for fever and coughs.

– Yes, toilet paper is important, but so are hand sanitizers, disinfectants, sanitary wipes, eye protection and gloves.

– Get your finances in order. Make sure you can pay your bills and have cash on hand.

– Perhaps most importantly, relax and don’t panic. And pay attention to the news and what is happening around you.

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